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10 Best Places to Visit in Congo - Brazzaville

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Congo Tourist Attractions: 14 Top Places to Visit

Planning to visit Congo? Check out our Congo Travel Guide video and see top most Tourist Attractions in Congo.

Top Places to visit in Congo:
Congo River, Virunga National Park, Mount Nyiragongo, Kahuzi-Biéga National Park, Lola ya Bonobo, Garamba National Park, Okapi Wildlife Reserve, Salonga National Park, Boyoma Falls, Livingstone Falls, Pool Malebo, Maiko National Park, Idjwi, Petites Chutes de la Lukaya

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Brazzaville, Congo

Brazzaville is the capital and largest city of the Republic of the Congo and is located on the Congo River. As of the 2007 census, it had a population of 1.37 million. The projection of the CNSEE (national statistics centre) shows an increase to 1.7 million by 2015, but the projection was made before 2007 and based on a lower estimate of the population (1.26 million) than recorded in the census. The United Nations Population Division estimate for 2014 is 1.83 million. The populous city of Kinshasa (more than 10 million inhabitants in 2014), capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, lies across the Congo River from Brazzaville. Together with Kinshasa, the combined conurbation of Kinshasa-Brazzaville has thus about 12 million inhabitants (although significant political and infrastructure challenges prevent the two cities from functioning with any meaningful connection). Over a third of the population of the Republic of Congo lives in the capital, and it is home to 40% of non-agricultural employment. It is also a financial and administrative capital.

Brazzaville, Brazzaville Photos, Brazzaville Photos, Brazzaville Pictures, Brazzaville Images, Brazzaville, Congo, Brazzaville Guide
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Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of Republic of the Congo

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1. Brazzaville
2. Pointe-Noire
3. Dolisie
4. Nkayi
5. Kindamba
6. Impfondo
7. Ouésso
8. Madingou
9. Owando
10. Sibiti

Music : Alright,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library

The Republic of the Congo (French: République du Congo), also known as Congo Republic or Congo-Brazzaville, is a country located in Central Africa. It is bordered by Gabon, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda.

The region was dominated by Bantu-speaking tribes, who built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French colony of Equatorial Africa. Upon independence in 1960, the former colony of French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People's Republic of the Congo was a Marxist–Leninist single-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multi-party elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War.

Bantu-speaking peoples who founded tribes during the Bantu expansions largely displaced and absorbed the earliest inhabitants of the region, the Pygmy people, about 1500 BC. The Bakongo, a Bantu ethnicity that also occupied parts of present-day Angola, Gabon and Democratic Republic of the Congo, formed the basis for ethnic affinities and rivalries among those countries. Several Bantu kingdoms—notably those of the Kongo, the Loango, and the Teke—built trade links leading into the Congo River basin.

The Portuguese explorer Diogo Cão reached the mouth of the Congo in 1484. Commercial relationships quickly grew up between the inland Bantu kingdoms and European merchants who traded various commodities, manufactured goods, and slaves captured from the hinterlands. For centuries the Congo river delta served as a major commercial hub for transatlantic trade. However, direct European colonization of the area began in the late 19th century and eroded the power of the Bantu societies in the region.

The area north of the Congo River came under French sovereignty in 1880 as a result of Pierre de Brazza's treaty with Makoko of the Bateke. This Congo Colony became known first as French Congo, then as Middle Congo in 1903. In 1908, France organized French Equatorial Africa (AEF), comprising Middle Congo, Gabon, Chad, and Oubangui-Chari (the modern Central African Republic). The French designated Brazzaville as the federal capital. Economic development during the first 50 years of colonial rule in Congo centered on natural-resource extraction. The methods were often brutal: establishment of the Congo–Ocean Railroad following World War I has been estimated to have cost at least 14,000 lives.

During the Nazi occupation of France during World War II, Brazzaville functioned as the symbolic capital of Free France between 1940 and 1943. The Brazzaville Conference of 1944 heralded a period of major reform in French colonial policy. Congo benefited from the postwar expansion of colonial administrative and infrastructure spending as a result of its central geographic location within AEF and the federal capital at Brazzaville. It also received a local legislature after the adoption of the 1946 constitution that established the Fourth Republic.

Following the revision of the French constitution that established the Fifth Republic in 1958, the AEF dissolved into its constituent parts, each of which became an autonomous colony within the French Community. During these reforms, Middle Congo became known as the Republic of the Congo in 1958[9] and published its first constitution in 1959. Antagonism between the pro-Opangault Mbochis and the pro-Youlou Balalis resulted in a series of riots in Brazzaville in February 1959, which the French Army subdued.

The Republic of the Congo received full independence from France on August 15, 1960. Fulbert Youlou ruled as the country's first president until labour elements and rival political parties instigated a three-day uprising that ousted him. The Congolese military took charge of the country briefly and installed a civilian provisional government headed by Alphonse Massamba-Débat.

Under the 1963 constitution, Massamba-Débat was elected President for a five-year term. During Massamba-Débat's term in office the regime adopted scientific socialism as the country's constitutional ideology. In 1965, Congo established relations with the Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China, North Korea and North Vietnam. Massamba-Débat was unable to reconcile various institutional and ideological factions and his regime ended abruptly with a bloodless coup d'état in August 1968.

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Go to Congo

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Trip to Congo May 2015. Province of Kouilou.
Filmed with GoPro 3, Iphone 6, Panasonic FTZ3

Music: 'After Gold' by Big Wild.
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The Best of the Congo

The Republic of the Congo (French: République du Congo), also known as the Congo Republic,Congo-Brazzaville or simply Congo, is a country located in Central Africa. It is bordered by five countries: Gabon and the Atlantic Ocean to the west; Cameroon to the northwest; the Central African Republic to the northeast; the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the east and south; and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda to the southwest.

The region was dominated by Bantu-speaking tribes, who built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French colony of Equatorial Africa.Upon independence in 1960, the former colony of French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People's Republic of the Congo was a Marxist–Leninist one-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multi-party elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War and President Denis Sassou Nguesso has ruled for 26 of the past 36 years.

The political stability and development of hydrocarbon production made Republic of the Congo the fourth largest oil producer in the Gulf of Guinea and provided the country with a relative prosperity despite the poor state of its infrastructure and public services and an unequal distribution of oil revenues


Song: Lache-Moi Le Morale by Piérette Adams

Sources:
Republic of Congo country profile

Congo, Republic of

Republic of the Congo on Wikipedia

The Congo Dandies: living in poverty and spending a fortune to look like a million dollars

“La Sape” is a unique movement based in Congo that unites fashion-conscious men who are ready to splurge money they don’t really have on designer clothes. Dressing in stark contrast with their surroundings, these elegant ambiance-makers become true local celebrities… but this fame comes at a price.

The Republic of the Congo in Central Africa can’t boast of high standards of living. Yet, there are men here who are prepared to spend a fortune on designer suits. They call themselves “sapeurs” – members of the “La Sape” movement. “La Sape” comes from French and stands for “The Society of Ambiance-Makers and Elegant People”. For its adherents, it’s all about style and elegance, the right combination of colours and textures, brand-names and the highest quality materials. They derive true joy from showing off their attire on the streets of Brazzaville – the country’s capital and the centre of the “La Sape” movement. Walking down dusty streets lined with clay houses, they turn heads and feel like kings. And there’s no price they won’t pay for this.

In fact, behind the image of success these dandies project, there are often stories of significant financial troubles caused by their extravagant hobby. To afford the price tag of their designer clothes, “sapeurs” have to save, borrow and even steal money, sometimes bringing ruin to their families. But even the grim consequences of their indulgent dressing habits often don’t stop “sapeurs” from spending money they don’t really have. They are in constant competition with each other and investing in their image is more important to them than improving their living conditions. Dressing smartly becomes a true addiction that is very hard to conquer.

However, some “sapeurs” do strive to find a balance between looking chic and being reasonable with their spending. They insist that the “La Sape” movement isn’t about designer suits but rather developing impeccable taste. They make an emphasis on learning to dress well but within one’s means. This way, style and elegance will demand fewer sacrifices from their devotees and will be accessible to more sophisticated men.

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Congo: What to see and where to stay

Changing the face of African travel, the Republic of the Congo has opened up Central Africa’s great equatorial rainforests and intrepid travellers can now walk through sunlit jungle in search of gorillas and chimpanzees, stake out salt licks to wait for shy forest buffalo and elephant, and sweep a spotlight around at night to look for rare antelope and stealthy predators.

With most of its population concentrated in the south and the capital Brazzaville, Congo has managed to keep most of its northern forests and wetlands intact, the epitome of which is the spectacular Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Here, over 13 000 km² of primary rainforest provides Central Africa’s most important sanctuary for lowland gorillas and forest elephants. Odzala’s best accommodation is a trio of luxurious fly-in camps called Mboko, Ngaga and Lango. It’s worth the effort to travel there: these sensitively designed eco-lodges deliver comfort and adventure in equal proportions, and something of a pioneering spirit fills the people who you meet there. Expert guides lead you along forest paths clouded with dazzling butterflies; boatmen take you down lazy rivers to the calls of monkeys and tropical birds.

The best game viewing is at a ‘bai’, a marshy forest clearing where open water, good grazing and vital minerals in the soil attract some of Africa’s hardest-to-see animals. Forest elephant, bush pig and forest buffalo wallow in the mud; leopard, hyena and even bongo, the rainforest’s largest antelope, slip in silently after dark. The most dramatic wildlife experience, however, is deep in the forest’s interior where lowland gorillas still live in unprecedented numbers. Finding them is tough work – the rainforest does not give up its secrets so lightly – but the reward is an hour in the company of a habituated gorilla family, complete with curious infants, moody teenagers and poker-faced silverbacks.

Raw, real and perfect for experienced safari travellers with a thirst for adventure, Congo is one of Africa’s newest travel destinations. It’s also one of the most under-developed, so take the uncertainty out of arranging a Congo safari and speak to us about creating an itinerary that delivers it as a complete stand-alone itinerary or in combination with other African safari destinations and the Indian Ocean islands.


Where to go in Congo:

Congo Safari | Gorilla Trek:

Accommodation Featured in this Video:

Mboko Camp:

Ngaga Camp:

Lango Camp:

Floresta do Maiombe 2

Está situada na região norte da Província de Cabinda, fazendo fronteira com o Congo Brazzaville e a República Democrática do Congo, ocupando uma vasta extensão territorial de 290 mil hectares, distribuídos entre os municípios de Buco Zau (comunas de Inhuca e Necuto) e Belize (comunas de Miconge e Luali). Apresenta uma densa vegetação com árvores frondosas com 50 metros de altura onde podemos destacar o Pau-Rosa, Ngulo Mazi, entre outros. A fauna está constituída de animais de grande porte como os Elefantes, Rinocerontes, Pacaças, vários primatas como os gorilas, chimpanzés, pequenos macacos e preguiças, vários tipos de roedores, aves raras como o papagaio cinzento e periquitos.



Congo Community



One of Africa’s greatest assets is its diverse blend of people, from the cosmopolitan café culture of the cities to the fiercely distinctive Maasai and Sambura of East Africa, to the Himba who live in the inhospitable stretches of northern Namibia. Encountering an authentic traditional community can be a life-changing experience for Westerners, opening our eyes to both the raw beauty and tough challenges faced by people living in remote settings. These communities are often carefully balancing the preservation of an age-old heritage with the advantages of modern medicine and Western schooling. We were privileged to meet such a community, who welcomed us warmly and shared a slice of village life with us. Next Episode: Boat, kayak and hike Lango Bai.

Ngaga Camp, Republic of Congo


We loved staying at this beautiful jungle lodge. Just six thatch-and-timber suites set in the middle of the rainforest, Ngaga Camp makes a truly tranquil base from which to explore the forest on guided nature walks and gorilla treks. As if all these advantages aren’t enough, the camp shares its emerald address with Odzala’s gorilla research team. Critically endangered, the western lowland gorillas are definitely the main attraction and getting to meet some of the researchers who are dedicated to studying them is very special. Like us, you’ll probably love the feel-good factor of knowing that every tourist dollar contributes to conserving both the great apes and their habitat. Next episode: we meet a Congo Community.
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IFLYtheworld.com Lusaka

Movie with travel tips about Lusaka, Zambia produced especially for IFLYtheworld.com, a travel guide with tips, movies, stories, information and fun, all contributed by airline crew.

3418 Travel by car from Kinshasa to Matadi, Congo D.R.

Travel by car from Kinshasa to Matadi, Congo D.R.
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The Best of the Democratic Republic of Congo

DR Congo is a vast country with immense economic resources and, until recently, has been at the center of what some observers call Africa's world war, with widespread civilian suffering the result.

The war claimed an up to six million lives, either as a direct result of fighting or because of disease and malnutrition.

The war had an economic as well as a political side. Fighting was fuelled by the country's vast mineral wealth, with all sides taking advantage of the anarchy to plunder natural resources. Some militia fight on in the east, where a big United Nations force is trying to keep the peace.

Sources:
The DR Congo country profile

The D.R.C on Wikipedia

DR Congo facts

The DRC by Jeep

Join me as I drive my Overland Modified Jeep Wrangler 80,000 miles around Africa.


In this episode I cross the infamous Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) - formally Zaire. Simply getting to the border turns into an expedition, then the slog to the Mighty Congo River and the ferry to cross.

You can follow my adventure in real time across social media at:

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Congo - 2016 | Travel

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Beautiful Congo

Congo

Fabulous Congo / Le Congo Fabileux

This video is a video about my primary country of origin, the Republic of the Congo, also known as Congo-Brazzaville or just the Congo. Just like I've made a video about my native country, France, I also feel the need to promote the Congo the same way.

The Republic of the Congo (French: République du Congo), also known as Congo Republic,West Congo, or Congo-Brazzaville, is a country located in Central Africa. It is bordered by five countries: Gabon to the west; Cameroon to the northwest; the Central African Republic to the northeast; the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the east and south; and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda to the southwest.

The region was dominated by Bantu-speaking tribes, who built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French colony of Equatorial Africa.Upon independence in 1960, the former colony of French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People's Republic of the Congo was a Marxist–Leninist single-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multi-party elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War and President Denis Sassou Nguesso has ruled for 26 of the past 36 years.

Bantu-speaking peoples who founded tribes during the Bantu expansions largely displaced and absorbed the earliest inhabitants of the region, the Pygmy people, about 1500 BC. The Bakongo, a Bantu ethnicity that also occupied parts of present-day Angola, Gabon and Democratic Republic of the Congo, formed the basis for ethnic affinities and rivalries among those countries. Several Bantu kingdoms—notably those of the Kongo, the Loango, and the Teke—built trade links leading into the Congo River basin.

The Congo got its independence on August 15th 1960 from France


For more about the Congo, please dig in the following sources:

Sources:
Republic of the Congo profile

Republic of Congo profile - Facts

Republic of the Congo facts from CIA

Congo's tourism site

Mining in the Republic of Congo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mining in Republic of the Congo

INFORMUCATE TRAVEL GUIDE: DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO



Informucate Travel Guides give you the fast facts on the world’s most visited countries, cities, and tourist attractions. Start planning you next trip today:

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View of Congo seen aerially

Aerial view of the human settlements and tropical rain forests of Congo along the mighty Congo river.

The Congo River (also known as the Zaire River; French: (le) fleuve Congo/Zaïre; Portuguese: rio Congo/Zaire) is a river in Africa. It is the second largest river in the world by discharge (after the Amazon), and the world's deepest river with measured depths in excess of 220 m (720 ft).[2] The Congo-Chambeshi river has an overall length of 4,700 km (2,920 mi), which makes it the ninth longest river (in terms of discharge, the Chambeshi is a tributary of the Lualaba River, Lualaba being the name of the Congo River upstream of the Boyoma Falls, extending for 1,800 km). Measured along the Lualaba, the Congo River has a total length of 4,370 km (2,715 mi). It crosses the equator twice.[3] The Congo Basin has a total area of about 4 million km2, or 13% of the entire African landmass

Source: Wikipedia

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Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of Gabon

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1. Libreville
2. Port-Gentil
3. Franceville
4. Oyem
5. Moanda
6. Mouila
7. Lambaréné
8. Tchibanga
9. Koulamoutou
10. Makokou

Gabon, officially the Gabonese Republic (French: République gabonaise), is a sovereign state on the west coast of Central Africa. Located on the equator, Gabon is bordered by Equatorial Guinea to the northwest, Cameroon to the north, the Republic of the Congo on the east and south, and the Gulf of Guinea to the west. It has an area of nearly 270,000 square kilometres (100,000 sq mi) and its population is estimated at 1.5 million people. Its capital and largest city is Libreville.

Since its independence from France on August 17, 1960, Gabon has had three presidents. In the early 1990s, Gabon introduced a multi-party system and a new democratic constitution that allowed for a more transparent electoral process and reformed many governmental institutions. Gabon was also a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council for the 2010–2011 term.

Low population density, abundant petroleum, and foreign private investment[ambiguous] have helped make Gabon one of the most prosperous countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, with the 2nd highest HDI and the third highest GDP per capita (PPP) (after Equatorial Guinea and Botswana) in the region.

The earliest inhabitants of the area were Pygmy peoples. They were largely replaced and absorbed by Bantu tribes as they migrated.

In the 15th century, the first Europeans arrived. The nation's present name originates from Gabão, Portuguese for cloak, which is roughly the shape of the estuary of the Komo River by Libreville. By the 18th century, a Myeni speaking kingdom known as Orungu formed in Gabon. French explorer Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza led his first mission to the Gabon-Congo area in 1875. He founded the town of Franceville, and was later colonial governor. Several Bantu groups lived in the area that is now Gabon when France officially occupied it in 1885.

In 1910, Gabon became one of the four territories of French Equatorial Africa, a federation that survived until 1959. These territories became independent on August 17, 1960. The first president of Gabon, elected in 1961, was Léon M'ba, with Omar Bongo Ondimba as his vice president.

After M'ba's accession to power, the press was suppressed, political demonstrations banned, freedom of expression curtailed, other political parties gradually excluded from power and the Constitution changed along French lines to vest power in the Presidency, a post that M'ba assumed himself. However, when M'ba dissolved the National Assembly in January 1964 to institute one-party rule, an army coup sought to oust him from power and restore parliamentary democracy. French paratroopers flew in within 24 hours to restore M'ba to power.

After a few days of fighting, the coup was over and the opposition imprisoned, despite widespread protests and riots. French soldiers still remain in the Camp de Gaulle on the outskirts of Gabon's capital to this day. When M'Ba died in 1967, Bongo replaced him as president.

In March 1968, Bongo declared Gabon a one-party state by dissolving the BDG and establishing a new party — the Parti Democratique Gabonais (PDG). He invited all Gabonese, regardless of previous political affiliation, to participate. Bongo sought to forge a single national movement in support of the government's development policies, using the PDG as a tool to submerge the regional and tribal rivalries that had divided Gabonese politics in the past. Bongo was elected President in February 1975; in April 1975, the position of vice president was abolished and replaced by the position of prime minister, who had no right to automatic succession. Bongo was re-elected President in both December 1979 and November 1986 to 7-year terms.

Economic discontent and a desire for political liberalization provoked violent demonstrations and strikes by students and workers in early 1990. In response to grievances by workers, Bongo negotiated with them on a sector-by-sector basis, making significant wage concessions. In addition, he promised to open up the PDG and to organize a national political conference in March–April 1990 to discuss Gabon's future political system. The PDG and 74 political organizations attended the conference. Participants essentially divided into two loose coalitions, the ruling PDG and its allies, and the United Front of Opposition Associations and Parties, consisting of the breakaway Morena Fundamental and the Gabonese Progress Party.

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