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10 Best Places to Visit in Central African Republic

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travel to : Central African Republic !!!

Best places to visit in Central African Republic !!! (CAR)

Best Tourist Destinations- Central African Republic Tourist Attractions

Best Tourist Destinations- Central African Republic Tourist Attractions
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Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of Central African Republic

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1. Bangui
2. Bimbo
3. Berbérati
4. Carnot
5. Bambari
6. Bouar
7. Bossangoa
8. Bria
9. Bangassou
10. Nola

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Music : Alot For a Light,Jingle Punks; YouTube Audio Library

The Central African Republic is a landlocked country in Central Africa. It is bordered by Chad to the north, Sudan to the northeast, South Sudan to the east, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of the Congo to the south and Cameroon to the west. The CAR covers a land area of about 620,000 square kilometres (240,000 sq mi) and had an estimated population of around 4.7 million as of 2014.

Most of the CAR consists of Sudano-Guinean savannas, but the country also includes a Sahelo-Sudanian zone in the north and an equatorial forest zone in the south. Two thirds of the country is within the Ubangi River basin (which flows into the Congo), while the remaining third lies in the basin of the Chari, which flows into Lake Chad.

What is today the Central African Republic has been inhabited for millennia; however, the country's current borders were established by France, which ruled the country as a colony starting in the late 19th century. After gaining independence from France in 1960, the Central African Republic was ruled by a series of autocratic leaders; by the 1990s, calls for democracy led to the first multi-party democratic elections in 1993. Ange-Félix Patassé became president, but was later removed by General François Bozizé in the 2003 coup. The Central African Republic Bush War began in 2004 and, despite a peace treaty in 2007 and another in 2011, fighting broke out between government, Muslim, and Christian factions in December 2012, leading to ethnic and religious cleansing and massive population displacement in 2013 and 2014.

Despite its significant mineral deposits and other resources, such as uranium reserves, crude oil, gold, diamonds, lumber, and hydropower, as well as significant quantities of arable land, the Central African Republic is among the ten poorest countries in the world. As of 2013, according to the Human Development Index (HDI), the country had a low level of human development, ranking at 185th out of 187 countries.

Approximately 10,000 years ago, desertification forced hunter-gatherer societies south into the Sahel regions of northern Central Africa, where some groups settled and began farming as part of the Neolithic Revolution. Initial farming of white yam progressed into millet and sorghum, and before 3000 BC the domestication of African oil palm improved the groups' nutrition and allowed for expansion of the local populations. Bananas arrived in the region and added an important source of carbohydrates to the diet; they were also used in the production of alcoholic beverages. This Agricultural Revolution, combined with a Fish-stew Revolution, in which fishing began to take place, and the use of boats, allowed for the transportation of goods. Products were often moved in ceramic pots, which are the first known examples of artistic expression from the region's inhabitants.

The Bouar Megaliths in the western region of the country indicate an advanced level of habitation dating back to the very late Neolithic Era (c. 3500-2700 BC). Ironworking arrived in the region around 1000 BC from both Bantu cultures in what is today Nigeria and from the Nile city of Meroë, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush.

During the Bantu Migrations from about 1000 BC to AD 1000, Ubangian-speaking people spread eastward from Cameroon to Sudan, Bantu-speaking people settled in the southwestern regions of the CAR, and Central Sudanic-speaking people settled along the Ubangi River in what is today Central and East CAR.

Production of copper, salt, dried fish, and textiles dominated the economic trade in the Central African region.

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Bangui
Bagui is the capital & largest city of the Central African Republic . It is situated on the northern bank of the Ubangi River. It is a very important trade centre. The nightlife & markets here are worth visiting. The presidential palace is a very attractive here. A so called big mosque is a popular place to visit & also a number of museums that document both the colonization of the country as well as the culture of its indigenous people.
Boali waterfalls
It is situated in the town of Boali , a little upstream the main town.It is 164 ft tall & best experienced during the wetter conditions of the weather. Its best to visit this place during the rainy season. The lake is abundant in crocodiles.
Dzanga-sangha National Park
This park is situated in southwest region of the country near the borders with Cameroon & the Republic of Congo. It is one of the most important parks in the country also known as the second largest rainforest in the world. It is distinctive for its thick lowland rainforest & strategic location near the Sangha River. The reserve is home to large species of mammals such as forest elephants, the bongo, chimpanzee, western lowland gorillas, sitatungas, water buffaloes etc.
Manovo-gounda st Floris National Park
This park is located in the northeastern region near the border with Chad. The park is divided into three types of landscape, the flood plain around the Bahr Aouk & Bahr Kameur rivers, the mountainous south & the lowland plains in between. Visitors can see there black rhinoceros, leopards, cheetahs, elephants, lions, giraffes, hippos& buffaloes as well as 320 different bird species.
Zinga
Zinga is a small town lying on the banks of the Oubangui river, which flows through the southern part of the country. It is around 100 km south of Bangui city. Though it is a small town but it is valuable place to visit for tourist. The wooden houses here are great examples of traditional Congo houses. The people of the town are friendly & welcoming to tourists.

Bambari in Central African Republic, travel

Bambari in Central African Republic, travel
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Beautiful Central African Republic Landscape - hotels accommodation yacht charte

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3 BEST Places To VISIT in Central African Republic__ PlasFun

Click on the links to visit following countries around the world:

#AFRICA

01. Egypt:
02. South Africa:
03. Zimbabwe:
04. Ethiopia:
05. Kenya:
06. Morocco:
07. Nigeria:
08. Tanzania:
09. Gambia:
10. Tunisia:
11. Algeria:
12. Angola:
13. Benin:
14. Botswana:
15. Burkina Faso:
16. Burundi:
17. Cabo Verde:
18. Cameroon:
19. Central African Republic:

Top 10 Cities of Malawi

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1) Blantyre
2) Chelinda
3) Dowa
4) Dwangwa
5) Kasungu National Park
6) Lilongwe
7) Mangoche
8) Mzuzu
9) Salima
10) Zomba

Malawi (/məˈlɑːwi/; Chichewa: [malaβi][need tone]), officially the Republic of Malawi, is a landlocked country in southeast Africa that was formerly known as Nyasaland. It is bordered by Zambia to the northwest, Tanzania to the northeast, and Mozambique on the east, south and west. The country is separated from Tanzania and Mozambique by Lake Malawi. Malawi is over 118,000 km2 (45,560 sq mi) with an estimated population of 16,777,547 (July 2013 est.). Its capital is Lilongwe, which is also Malawi's largest city; the second largest is Blantyre and the third is Mzuzu. The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name of the Nyanja people that inhabit the area. The country is also nicknamed The Warm Heart of Africa.[9]
The area of Africa now known as Malawi was settled by migrating Bantu groups around the 10th century. Centuries later in 1891 the area was colonized by the British. In 1953 Malawi, then known as Nyasaland, became part of the semi-independent central African Federation (CAF). The Federation was dissolved in 1963 and in 1964, Nyasaland gained full independence and was renamed Malawi. Upon gaining independence it became a single-party state under the presidency of Hastings Banda, who remained president until 1994, when he was ousted from power. Joyce Banda (no relation) is the current president, raised to that position after president Bingu wa Mutharika died in 2012. She is the first female leader in Malawi.[10] Malawi has a democratic, multi-party government. Malawi has a small military force that includes an army, a navy and an air wing. Malawi's foreign policy is pro-Western and includes positive diplomatic relations with most countries and participation in several international organisations.
Malawi is among the world's least-developed countries. The economy is heavily based in agriculture, with a largely rural population. The Malawian government depends heavily on outside aid to meet development needs, although this need (and the aid offered) has decreased since 2000. The Malawian government faces challenges in building and expanding the economy, improving education, health care, environmental protection, and becoming financially independent. Malawi has several programs developed since 2005 that focus on these issues, and the country's outlook appears to be improving, with improvements in economic growth, education and healthcare seen in 2007 and 2008.
Malawi has a low life expectancy and high infant mortality. There is a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, which is a drain on the labour force and government expenditures. There is a diverse population of native peoples, Asians and Europeans, with several languages spoken and an array of religious beliefs. Although there was tribal conflict in the past, by 2008 it had diminished considerably and the concept of a Malawian nationality had begun to form. Malawi has a culture combining native and colonial aspects, including sports, art, dance and music. Source :

Top 10 Poorest Countries in The World 2018 By GDP Per Capita

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Top 10 Poorest Countries in The World 2018
The richest countries have one thing in common, a proper and well established political environment supported by clear legislations, a corrupt-free government, and a strong judicial system. While these factors are only a drop in the ocean regarding what makes a country economically successful, the poorest countries in the world get these factors all wrong.
While the availability of natural resources is the foundation of an economically robust country, utilising the resources well is a whole other aspect. This is not civic education 101, so we will get straight to the point and list the countries yet to realise self-actualisation. Here are the top 10 poorest countries in the world as of 2018.
10. Madagascar – $1477
9. Guinea – $1388
8. Eritrea – $1210
7. Mozambique – $1208
6. Niger – $1069
5. Burundi – $951
4. Liberia – $934
3. Malawi – $819
2. The Democratic Republic of Congo – $753
1. Central African Republic – $636
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10 Best Destinations to Visit in Djibouti

Though it occupies a tiny corner in Northern Africa, Djibouti has copious amounts of beauty and sites that you really can’t believe unless you’ve seen them for yourself. Few places have such a variety of landscapes – like volcanoes, sinking plains, limestone chimneys with steam coming from the top, salt lakes, grand canyons, and gorgeous plateaus.
For those that love outdoor adventure, you’ll have plenty to keep you busy here. Enjoy snorkelling with the sharks, diving, kite surfing, and hiking. The country isn’t overly developed outside of the capital so spending time here makes for the perfect eco-travel experience as you get a peek of ancient nomadic life.

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TOP 10 BEST Places to SEE in AFRICA 2018__ PlasFun

Click on the links to visit following countries around the world:

#AFRICA

01. Egypt:
02. South Africa:
03. Zimbabwe:
04. Ethiopia:
05. Kenya:
06. Morocco:
07. Nigeria:
08. Tanzania:
09. Gambia:
10. Tunisia:
11. Algeria:
12. Angola:
13. Benin:
14. Botswana:
15. Burkina Faso:
16. Burundi:
17. Cabo Verde:
18. Cameroon:
19. Central African Republic:
20. Chad:
21. Comoros:
22. Cote d'Ivoire:
23. Democratic Republic of the Congo:
24. Djibouti:
25. Equatorial Guinea:
26. Eritrea:
27. Gabon:
28. Ghana:
29. Guinea:
30. Guinea-Bissau:
31. Lesotho:
32. Liberia:
33. Libya:
34. Madagascar:
35. Malawi:
36. Mali:
37. Mauritania:
38. Mauritius:
39. Mozambique:
40. Namibia:
41. Niger:
42. Republic of the Congo:
43. Rwanda:
44. Sao Tome and Principe:
45. Senegal:
46. Seychelles:
47. Sierra Leone:
48. Somalia:
49. South Sudan:
50. Sudan:
51. Swaziland:
52. Togo:
53. Uganda:
54. Zambia:
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Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of South Sudan

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1. Juba
2. Malakal
3. Wau
4. Yambio
5. Yei
6. Aweil
7. Gogrial
8. Rumbek
9. Bor
10. Torit

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Music: Voyeur,Jingle Punks; YouTube Audio Library

South Sudan, officially the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in northeastern Africa that gained its independence from Sudan in 2011. Its current capital is Juba, which is also its largest city. It is planned that the capital city will be changed to the more centrally located Ramciel in the future. South Sudan is bordered by the Republic of the Sudan to the north, Ethiopia to the east, Kenya to the southeast, Uganda to the south, the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the southwest, and the Central African Republic to the west. It includes the vast swamp region of the Sudd, formed by the White Nile and known locally as the Bahr al Jabal.

The territories of modern South Sudan and the Republic of the Sudan were occupied by Egypt under the Muhammad Ali Dynasty, and later governed as an Anglo-Egyptian condominium until Sudanese independence was achieved in 1956. Following the First Sudanese Civil War, the Southern Sudan Autonomous Region was formed in 1972 and lasted until 1983. A second Sudanese civil war soon developed and ended with the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005. Later that year, southern autonomy was restored when an Autonomous Government of Southern Sudan was formed.

South Sudan became an independent state on 9 July 2011, following a referendum that passed with 98.83% of the vote. It is a United Nations member state, a member state of the African Union, and a member state of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development. In July 2012, South Sudan signed the Geneva Conventions. South Sudan has suffered internal conflict since its independence.

The Nilotic people of South Sudan—the Acholi, Anyuak, Bari, Dinka, Nuer, Shilluk and others—first entered South Sudan sometime before the 10th century. During the period from the 15th to the 19th centuries, tribal migrations, largely from the area of Bahr el Ghazal, brought the Anyuak Dinka, Nuer and Shilluk to their modern locations of both Bahr El Ghazal and Upper Nile Regions, while the, Acholi and Bari settled in Equatoria.

The Bantu people of South Sudan are—the Azande, Mundu, Avukaya and Baka people Azande people, who entered South Sudan in the 16th century, established the region's largest state of Equatoria Region.

The Azande are the third-largest ethnic group in South Sudan while the Bari are fourth-largest. They are found in the Maridi, Yambio, and Tombura districts in the tropical rain-forest belt of Western Equatoria, the Adio of Azande client in Yei, Central Equatoria and Western Bahr el Ghazal. In the 18th century, the Avungara sib rose to power over the rest of Azande society and this domination continued into the 20th century. Geographical barriers prevented the spread of Islam to the southerners, thus enabling them to retain their social and cultural heritage, as well as their political and religious institutions.

Slavery had been an institution of Sudanese life throughout history. The slave trade in the south intensified in the 19th century and continued after the British had suppressed slavery in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Annual Sudanese slave raids into non-Muslim territories resulted in the capture of countless thousands of southern Sudanese, and the destruction of the region's stability and economy.

The Azande have had good relations with the neighbors, namely the Moru, Mundu, Pöjulu, Avukaya, Baka and the small groups in Bahr el Ghazal, due to the expansionist policy of their king Gbudwe, in the 18th century. In the 19th century, the Azande fought the French, the Belgians and the Mahdists to maintain their independence. Egypt, under the rule of Khedive Ismail Pasha, first attempted to control the region in the 1870s, establishing the province of Equatoria in the southern portion. Egypt's first governor was Samuel Baker, commissioned in 1869, followed by Charles George Gordon in 1874 and by Emin Pasha in 1878.

The Mahdist Revolt of the 1880s destabilized the nascent province, and Equatoria ceased to exist as an Egyptian outpost in 1889. Important settlements in Equatoria included Lado, Gondokoro, Dufile and Wadelai. European colonial maneuverings in the region came to a head in 1898, when the Fashoda Incident occurred at present-day Kodok; Britain and France almost went to war over the region. In 1947, British hopes to join South Sudan with Uganda as well as, living Western Equatoria as part of Belgium French Congo The Democratic Republic of Congo were dashed by the Rajaf Conference to unify North and South Sudan.

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Top 10 Cities of Uganda

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1) Arua
2) Entebbe
3) Jinja
4) Kabale
5) Kampala
6) Kasese
7) Masindi
8) Mbale
9) Soroti
10) Tororo

Uganda (/juːˈɡændə/ yew-gan-də or /juːˈɡɑːndə/ yew-gahn-də), officially the Republic of Uganda, is a landlocked country in East Africa. Uganda is bordered on the east by Kenya, on the north by South Sudan, on the west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, on the southwest by Rwanda, and on the south by Tanzania. The southern part of the country includes a substantial portion of Lake Victoria, shared with Kenya and Tanzania. Uganda lies within the Nile basin, and has a varied but generally equatorial climate.
Uganda takes its name from the Buganda kingdom, which encompasses a large portion of the south of the country including the capital Kampala. The people of Uganda were hunter-gatherers until 1,700 to 2,300 years ago, when Bantu-speaking populations migrated to the southern parts of the country.
Beginning in the late 1800s, the area was ruled as a colony by the British, who established administrative law across the territory. Uganda gained independence from Britain on 9 October 1962. The period since then has been marked by intermittent conflicts, most recently a lengthy civil war against the Lord's Resistance Army, which has caused tens of thousands of casualties and displaced more than a million people.
The official language is English. Luganda, a central language, is widely spoken across the country, and multiple other languages are also spoken including Swahili. The current President of Uganda is Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, who came to power in a coup in 1986. Source :

Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of Niger

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1. Agadez
2. Arlit
3. Birni-N'Konni
4. Dogondoutchi
5. Dosso
6. Maradi
7. Niamey
8. Tahoua
9. Tessaoua
10. Zinder

Niger, officially the Republic of Niger, is a landlocked country in Western Africa, named after the Niger River. Niger covers a land area of almost 1,270,000 km2, making it the largest nation in West Africa, with over 80 percent of its land area covered by the Sahara desert. The country's predominantly Islamic population of 17,138,707 is mostly clustered in the far south and west of the nation. The capital city is Niamey, located in the far-southwest corner of Niger.

Niger is a developing country, and is consistently one of the lowest-ranked in the United Nations' Human Development Index (HDI); it was ranked last at 187th for 2013. Much of the non-desert portions of the country are threatened by periodic drought and desertification. The economy is concentrated around subsistence and some export agriculture clustered in the more fertile south, and the export of raw materials, especially uranium ore. Niger faces serious challenges to development due to its landlocked position, desert terrain, poor education and poverty of its people, lack of infrastructure, poor health care, and environmental degradation.

Nigerien society reflects a diversity drawn from the long independent histories of its several ethnic groups and regions and their relatively short period living in a single state. Historically, what is now Niger has been on the fringes of several large states. Since independence, Nigeriens have lived under five constitutions and three periods of military rule. Following a military coup in 2010, Niger has become a democratic, multi-party state. A majority live in rural areas, and have little access to advanced education.

Early human settlement in Niger is evidenced by numerous archaeological remains. In prehistoric times, the climate of the Sahara (Tenere desert in Niger) was wet and provided favorable conditions for agriculture and livestock herding in fertile grasslands environment five thousand years ago. In 2005–2006, a graveyard in the Tenere desert was discovered by Paul Sereno, a paleontologist from the University of Chicago.

His team discovered 5,000 year old remains of a woman and two children in the Tenere Desert. The evidence along with remains of animals that do not typically live in desert are among the strongest evidence of the 'green' sahara in Niger. It is believed that progressive desertification around 5000 BCE pushed sedentary populations to the south and south-east (Lake Chad).

By at least the 5th century BCE, Niger became an area of trans-Saharan trade, led by the Berber tribes from the north, using camels as an adapted mean of transportation through the desert. This trade has made Agadez, a pivotal place of the trans-Saharan trade. This mobility, which will continue in waves for a couple of centuries, is accompanied with further migration to the south and interbreeding between southern black and northern white populations. It also helps the introduction of islam to the region at the end of the seventh century. Several empires and kingdoms also flourished during this era up to the beginning of colonization in Africa.

The Songhai Empire was an empire bearing the name of its main ethnic group, Songhai or Sonrai, and located in western Africa on the bend of the Niger River in present-day Niger, Mali and Burkina Faso. In the 600s, Songhai tribes settled down north of modern day Niamey and founded the Songhai city-states of Koukia and Gao. By the 1000s, Gao became the capital of the Songhai Empire.

From 1000 to 1325, The Songhai Empire prospered and managed to maintain peace with its neighboring empires including the Mali Empire. In 1325, the Songhai Empire was conquered by the Mali Empire, but was freed in 1335 by prince Ali Kolen and his brother, Songhai princes held captive by Moussa Kankan, the ruler of the Mali Empire. From the mid-15th to the late 16th century, Songhai was one of the largest Islamic empires in history.

Between the Niger River and the Lake Chad lay a fertile area and Hausa kingdoms. These kingdoms flourished from the mid-14th century up until the early 19th century when they were conquered by Usman dan Fodio, founder of the Sokoto Empire. The Hausa kingdoms were not a compact entity but several federations of kingdoms more or less independent of each other. Their organization was somewhat democratic: the Hausa kings were elected by the notables of the country and could be removed by the latter.

The Hausa Kingdoms began as seven states founded according to the Bayajidda legend by the six sons of Bawo. Bawo was the unique son of the hausa queen Daurama and Bayajidda or (Abu Yazid by certain Nigerien historians) who came from Baghdad. The seven original hausa states were: Daoura (state of queen Daurama), Kano, Rano, Zaria, Gobir, Katsena and Biram.

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3 BEST Places To VISIT in Lesotho__ PlasFun

Click on the links to visit following countries around the world:

#AFRICA

01. Egypt:
02. South Africa:
03. Zimbabwe:
04. Ethiopia:
05. Kenya:
06. Morocco:
07. Nigeria:
08. Tanzania:
09. Gambia:
10. Tunisia:
11. Algeria:
12. Angola:
13. Benin:
14. Botswana:
15. Burkina Faso:
16. Burundi:
17. Cabo Verde:
18. Cameroon:
19. Central African Republic:
20. Chad:
21. Comoros:
22. Cote d'Ivoire:
23. Democratic Republic of the Congo:
24. Djibouti:
25. Equatorial Guinea:
26. Eritrea:
27. Gabon:
28. Ghana:
29. Guinea:
30. Guinea-Bissau:
31. Lesotho:

Top 10 Largest Cities or Towns of Republic of the Congo

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1. Brazzaville
2. Pointe-Noire
3. Dolisie
4. Nkayi
5. Kindamba
6. Impfondo
7. Ouésso
8. Madingou
9. Owando
10. Sibiti

Music : Alright,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library

The Republic of the Congo (French: République du Congo), also known as Congo Republic or Congo-Brazzaville, is a country located in Central Africa. It is bordered by Gabon, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Angolan exclave of Cabinda.

The region was dominated by Bantu-speaking tribes, who built trade links leading into the Congo River basin. Congo-Brazzaville was formerly part of the French colony of Equatorial Africa. Upon independence in 1960, the former colony of French Congo became the Republic of the Congo. The People's Republic of the Congo was a Marxist–Leninist single-party state from 1970 to 1991. Multi-party elections have been held since 1992, although a democratically elected government was ousted in the 1997 Republic of the Congo Civil War.

Bantu-speaking peoples who founded tribes during the Bantu expansions largely displaced and absorbed the earliest inhabitants of the region, the Pygmy people, about 1500 BC. The Bakongo, a Bantu ethnicity that also occupied parts of present-day Angola, Gabon and Democratic Republic of the Congo, formed the basis for ethnic affinities and rivalries among those countries. Several Bantu kingdoms—notably those of the Kongo, the Loango, and the Teke—built trade links leading into the Congo River basin.

The Portuguese explorer Diogo Cão reached the mouth of the Congo in 1484. Commercial relationships quickly grew up between the inland Bantu kingdoms and European merchants who traded various commodities, manufactured goods, and slaves captured from the hinterlands. For centuries the Congo river delta served as a major commercial hub for transatlantic trade. However, direct European colonization of the area began in the late 19th century and eroded the power of the Bantu societies in the region.

The area north of the Congo River came under French sovereignty in 1880 as a result of Pierre de Brazza's treaty with Makoko of the Bateke. This Congo Colony became known first as French Congo, then as Middle Congo in 1903. In 1908, France organized French Equatorial Africa (AEF), comprising Middle Congo, Gabon, Chad, and Oubangui-Chari (the modern Central African Republic). The French designated Brazzaville as the federal capital. Economic development during the first 50 years of colonial rule in Congo centered on natural-resource extraction. The methods were often brutal: establishment of the Congo–Ocean Railroad following World War I has been estimated to have cost at least 14,000 lives.

During the Nazi occupation of France during World War II, Brazzaville functioned as the symbolic capital of Free France between 1940 and 1943. The Brazzaville Conference of 1944 heralded a period of major reform in French colonial policy. Congo benefited from the postwar expansion of colonial administrative and infrastructure spending as a result of its central geographic location within AEF and the federal capital at Brazzaville. It also received a local legislature after the adoption of the 1946 constitution that established the Fourth Republic.

Following the revision of the French constitution that established the Fifth Republic in 1958, the AEF dissolved into its constituent parts, each of which became an autonomous colony within the French Community. During these reforms, Middle Congo became known as the Republic of the Congo in 1958[9] and published its first constitution in 1959. Antagonism between the pro-Opangault Mbochis and the pro-Youlou Balalis resulted in a series of riots in Brazzaville in February 1959, which the French Army subdued.

The Republic of the Congo received full independence from France on August 15, 1960. Fulbert Youlou ruled as the country's first president until labour elements and rival political parties instigated a three-day uprising that ousted him. The Congolese military took charge of the country briefly and installed a civilian provisional government headed by Alphonse Massamba-Débat.

Under the 1963 constitution, Massamba-Débat was elected President for a five-year term. During Massamba-Débat's term in office the regime adopted scientific socialism as the country's constitutional ideology. In 1965, Congo established relations with the Soviet Union, the People's Republic of China, North Korea and North Vietnam. Massamba-Débat was unable to reconcile various institutional and ideological factions and his regime ended abruptly with a bloodless coup d'état in August 1968.

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Malawi-Afrika "The Warm Heart of Africa" Part 1

Welcome to my travelchannel.On my channel you can find almost 1000 films of more than 70 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy!

Malawi-Afrika:
Malawi's capital is Lilongwe, and its commercial centre is Blantyre with a population of over 500,000 people. Malawi has two sites listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Lake Malawi National Park was first listed in 1984 and the Chongoni Rock Art Area was listed in 2006.
Malawi,officially the Republic of Malawi, is a landlocked country in southeast Africa that was formerly known as Nyasaland. It is bordered by Zambia to the northwest, Tanzania to the northeast, and Mozambique on the east, south and west. The country is separated from Tanzania and Mozambique by Lake Malawi. Malawi is over 118,000 km2 (45,560 sq mi) with an estimated population of more than 13,900,000. Its capital is Lilongwe, which is also Malawi's largest city; the second largest is Blantyre and the third is Mzuzu. The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name of the Nyanja people that inhabit the area. The country is also nicknamed The Warm Heart of Africa.
Malawi is a landlocked country in southeastern Africa, bordered by Zambia to the northwest, Tanzania to the northeast and Mozambique to the south, southwest and southeast. It lies between latitudes 9° and 18°S, and longitudes 32° and 36°E.
The Great Rift Valley runs through the country from north to south, and to the east of the valley lies Lake Malawi (also called Lake Nyasa), making up over three-quarters of Malawi's eastern boundary. Lake Malawi is sometimes called the Calendar Lake as it is about 365 miles (587 km) long and 52 miles (84 km) wide.[38] The Shire River flows from the south end of the lake and joins the Zambezi River 250 miles (400 km) farther south in Mozambique. The surface of Lake Malawi is located at 1,500 feet (457 m) above sea level, with a maximum depth of 2,300 feet (701 m), which means the lake bottom is over 700 feet (213 m) below sea level at some points.
Lake Malawi in the mountainous sections of Malawi surrounding the Rift Valley, plateaus rise generally 3,000 to 4,000 feet (914 to 1,219 m) above sea level, although some rise as high as 8,000 feet (2,438 m) in the north. To the south of Lake Malawi lie the Shire Highlands, gently rolling land at approximately 3,000 feet (914 m) above sea level. In this area, the Zomba and Mlanje mountain peaks rise to respective heights of 7,000 feet (2,134 m) and 10,000 feet (3,048 m).Wikipedia

Trip to Central Africa - Tanzania, Malawi, Burundi

Tanzania, Malawi, Burundi - best places in 1080 HD

The 5 Most African-American Friendly Countries

One of the most emailed questions I get to my inbox, is about countries that are African-American friendly. So what exactly does that mean? Watch the video and see!

And while it's important to realize every African-American will have their own unique experience, I just wanted to highlight the most pleasant experiences I've received through my 30 countries of travels (now 65 by the start of 2018).

Remember, it's okay to disagree and our experiences will vary based on so many things. Being an African-American WOMAN vs. an African-American MAN also renders its own unique account.

For those who enjoyed this video, feel free to check out a couple corresponding blog posts I wrote:

5 Cities in Europe That Welcome Black Skin Color -
The Best & Worst Things About Traveling While Black -

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