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Ethnic Groups of Afghanistan

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Ethnic group of Uzbekistan

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Ethnic minorities in Georgia

National minorities who live in towns and villages across Georgia usually have a common problem - poor knowledge or lack of knowledge of the state language. This forces them to be in an ‘information vacuum’, where they are cut off from social and political life of Georgia and consequentially, have a weak interest in the elections.

Journalist: Tamar Svanidze
Camera Operator: Ramaz Giorgashvili
Film was made within the project of Internews Georgia
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Village Life In Afghanistan! Ver: 3.0 HD video

This is a village life video in Afghanistan, Jalalabad District chaprihar , Villagers are just satisfied with the necessities of their living. They are always provided with fresh fruit, vegetables, fish, water, and clear air.

#afghanmirror
#Afghanistan
#traditional

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In Afghanistan, A Stranger is a Friend ????

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This video was spontaneous and unplanned.

My Afghan friend, Noor, and I were road tripping from Mazari Sharif Eastbound when we found a hitchhiker on the side of the road. We picked him up, and he invited us into his village for tea.

This is a video about the amazing hospitality in Afghanistan. I am shocked by how warm and inviting these people are!

I documented the entire experience and originally wasn't planning to upload it as a separate story, but it is too good not to share with you.

Thank you so much for watching, and for all of your comments/reactions/questions on my Afghanistan content so far. If you ask me, this is as good as it gets.

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Afghan Culture in Delhi

India is known for its rich cultural diversity and ethnic groups all over the world.

The age old Indian saying “Athithi Devo Bhava”, literally equates the position of a guest to God. Although most of us are well aware of the different Indian cultures thriving amidst the state boundaries but there are also a few international community’s which consider India to be their homeland.

One such example lies in the Bhogal area of Lajpat Nagar which has been home to thousands of refugees from Afghanistan. It has been years since they migrated from their homeland and settled in the southern patches of Delhi. Today, India is no less than a home to them and they have created a new life for themselves in this part of Delhi that is known to many as ‘Mini Kabul’.

While some are studying in the universities of Delhi, a few have set up their small businesses in the adjoining markets. A new shade of Afghani colour has enhanced the beauty of Delhi’s cultural canvas.

As the evening strikes, the community parks are seen with kids playing all together while ignoring the differences the borders have created.

Central Asia (Tajikistan Highlights-2018) Part 34

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On my channel you can find more than 1000 films of almost 80 countries. See the playlist on my youtube channel.Enjoy!
Tajikistan:
Tajikistan is a mountainous, landlocked country in Central Asia with an area of 143,100 km2 (55,300 sq mi) and an estimated population of 8.7 million people as of 2016. It is bordered by Afghanistan to the south, Uzbekistan to the west, Kyrgyzstan to the north, and China to the east. The traditional homelands of the Tajik people include present-day Tajikistan as well as parts of Afghanistan and Uzbekistan.
Geography
Tajikistan is landlocked, and is the smallest nation in Central Asia by area. It lies mostly between latitudes 36° and 41° N, and longitudes 67° and 75° E. It is covered by mountains of the Pamir range, and more than fifty percent of the country is over 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) above sea level. The only major areas of lower land are in the north (part of the Fergana Valley), and in the southern Kofarnihon and Vakhsh river valleys, which form the Amu Darya. Dushanbe is located on the southern slopes above the Kofarnihon valley. The Amu Darya and Panj rivers mark the border with Afghanistan, and the glaciers in Tajikistan's mountains are the major source of runoff for the Aral Sea. There are over 900 rivers in Tajikistan longer than 10 kilometres. Demographics
Tajikistan has a population of 8,734,951 (2016 est.) of which 70% are under the age of 30 and 35% are between the ages of 14 and 30. Tajiks who speak Tajik (a dialect of Persian) are the main ethnic group, although there are sizeable minorities of Uzbeks and Russians, whose numbers are declining due to emigration.The Pamiris of Badakhshan, a small population of Yaghnobi people, and a sizeable minority of Ismailis are all considered to belong to the larger group of Tajiks. All citizens of Tajikistan are called Tajikistanis.
In 1989, ethnic Russians in Tajikistan made up 7.6% of the population, but they are now less than 0.5%, after the civil war spurred Russian emigration. The ethnic German population of Tajikistan has also declined due to emigration: having topped at 38,853 in 1979, it has almost vanished since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Ethnicities in Iran - Baloch people 2

#SistanAndBaluchestan #IranStudies #IranPrograms
Baloch people:
The Baloch or Baluch (Balochi: بلوچ) are an Iranian people who live mainly in the Balochistan region of the southeastern-most edge of the Iranian plateau in Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan, as well as neighboring regions, including those in India; and having a significant diaspora in the Arabian Peninsula.

They mainly speak Balochi, a Northwestern Iranian language, in contrast to their location on the Southeast of the Persosphere. About 50% of the total Baloch population live in Balochistan, a western province of Pakistan; 40% of the Baloch population are settled in Sindh; and a significant number of Baloch people in Punjab in Pakistan. They make up nearly 3.6% of Pakistan's population, about 2% of Iran's (1.5 million), and about 2% of Afghanistan's.

Etymology:
The exact origin of the word 'Baloch' is unclear. Rawlinson (1873) believed that it is derived from the name of the Babylonian king and god Belus. Dames (1904) believed that it is derived from the Persian term for cockscomb, said to have been used as a crest on the helmets of Baloch troops in 6th century BCE. Herzfeld (1968) proposed that it is derived from the Median term brza-vaciya, which describes a loud or aggressive way of speaking. Naseer Dashti (2012) presents another possibility, that of being derived from the name of the ethnic group 'Balaschik' living in Balashagan, between the Caspian Sea and Lake Van in present-day Turkey and Azerbaijan, who are believed to have migrated to Balochistan during the Sassanid times. The remnants of the original name such as 'Balochuk' and 'Balochiki' are said to be still used as ethnic names in Balochistan.


History:
According to Baloch lore, their ancestors hail from Aleppo in what is now Syria. They claim to be descendants of Ameer Hamza, uncle of the prophet Muhammad, who settled in Halab (present-day Aleppo). They fled to the Sistan region, remaining there for nearly 500 years until they fled to the Makran region following a deception against the Sistan leader Badr-ud-Din.

However, this origin story is not borne out by historical evidence. Based on an analysis of the linguistic connections of the Balochi language, which is one of the Western Iranian languages, the original homeland of the Balochi tribes was likely to the east or southeast of the central Caspian region. The Baloch began migrating towards the east in the late Sasanian period. The cause of the migration is unknown but may have been as a result of the generally unstable conditions in the Caspian area. The migrations occurred over several centuries.

By the 9th century, Arab writers refer to the Baloch as living in the area between Kerman, Khorasan, Sistan, and Makran in what is now eastern Iran. Although they kept flocks of sheep, the Baloches also engaged in plundering travellers on the desert routes. This brought them into conflict with the Buyids, and later the Ghaznavids and the Seljuqs. Adud al-Dawla of the Buyid dynasty launched a punitive campaign against them and defeated them in 971–972. After this, the Baloch continued their eastward migration towards what is now Balochistan province of Pakistan, although some remained behind and there are still Baloch in eastern part of the Iranian Sistan-Baluchestan and Kerman provinces. By the 13th–14th centuries waves of Baloch were moving into Sindh, and by the 15th century into the Punjab. According to Dr. Akhtar Baloch, Professor at University of Karachi, the Balochis migrated from #Balochistan during the Little Ice Age and settled in Sindh and Punjab. The Little Ice Age is conventionally defined as a period extending from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries,or alternatively, from about 1300 to about 1850. Although climatologists and historians working with local records no longer expect to agree on either the start or end dates of this period, which varied according to local conditions. According to Professor Baloch, the climate of Balochistan was very cold and the region was inhabitable during the winter so the Baloch people migrated in waves and settled in Sindh and Punjab.

The area where the #Baloch tribes settled was disputed between the Persian Safavids and the Mughal emperors. Although the Mughals managed to establish some control over the eastern parts of the area, by the 17th century, a tribal leader named Mir Hasan established himself as the first Khan of the Baloch. In 1666, he was succeeded by Mir Aḥmad Khan Qambarani who established the Balochi Khanate of Kalat under the Ahmadzai dynasty. Originally in alliance with the Mughals, the Khanate lost its autonomy in 1839 with the signing of a treaty with the British colonial government and the region effectively became part of British Raj.


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Afghan People Simple Life! Kandahar Arghandab | baba saib area

Its an out side area of Kandahar city (district) called baba saib people visiting it usually on Friday.
Arghandab is a district in the central part of Kandahar Province,

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Kabul City | View And Facts About Kabul City 2020 | Kabul Capital Of Afghanistan

#kabul #afghanistan #tolonews #Kabulcity

Kabul is the capital and largest city of Afghanistan, located in the eastern section of the country. It is also a municipality, forming part of the greater Kabul Province, and divided into 22 districts. According to estimates in 2020, the population of Kabul is 4.222 million, which includes all the major ethnic groups of Afghanistan. Afghanistan's only city with a population of over 1 million, Kabul serves as its political, cultural and economical center. Rapid urbanization has made Kabul the world's 75th largest city.

Kabul is located high up in a narrow valley between the Hindu Kush mountains, with an elevation of 1,790 metres (5,873 ft) making it one of the highest capitals in the world. The city is said to be over 3,500 years old, mentioned since at least the time of the Achaemenid Empire. Located at crossroads in Asia - roughly halfway between Istanbul in the west and Hanoi in the east - it is in a strategic location along the trade routes of South and Central Asia, and a key location of the ancient Silk Road.[8] It has been part of the Achaemenids followed by the Seleucids, Mauryans, Kushans, Kabul Shahis, Saffarids, Samanids, Ghaznavids, Ghurids, Khwarazmians, Qarlughids, Khaljis, Timurids, Mughals, and Hotaks, until finally becoming part of the Durrani Empire (also known as the Afghan Empire) in 1747.[9] Kabul became the capital of Afghanistan in 1776, during the reign of Timur Shah Durrani, the son of Ahmad Shah Durrani.

Milli Surood (God is Great) {پښتو/English} - Afghanistan

In 2004, the new Afghan constitution stated that a new national anthem for the country, requested by the post-Taliban government to signal a new era for Afghanistan, must be written in Pashto and contain the phrase Allahu Akbar (God is Great), and mention the names of the ethnic groups in Afghanistan. The winning composition was created by two Afghans living outside the country due to the war.

There has been some criticism of the anthem due to the above stated conditions of composition, that the Pashto requirement places less importance on the other languages spoken in the country; that the phrase Allahu Akbar should not be used in the anthem, as it is a sacred phrase in Islam and should not be set to music; and the ethnic groups mentioned in the anthem still do not represent the entire spectrum of nationalities in the country.

--
Information on Afghan national anthem taken from
Afghanistan grunge flag collected by ~pnkrckr of deviantART.
This version of the Afghan national anthem was originally used in a video made by slevisham.
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Afghan Archives

Dozens of rare images are on display at the Royal Geographical Society in central London - recording the panoramic views, striking architecture and distinctive ethnic groups living in the country at that time.

A tour of the exhibition with the BBC's World Affairs correspondent, and Afghan expert, David Loyn.

Courtesy:

Kandahar Afghanistan | District Arghandab

Arghandab (Pashto/Persian: ارغنداب‎) is a district in the central part of Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. most of the pomegranate gardens is in arghandab


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The video material shown on this channel is available for licensing. Additional clips can be made on request from our big stock of raw material. (footage)
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39 Things to know about Afghanistan

Do you want to go to Afghanistan? Watch this video before you move there. It can help you learn very basic practices that can help you ease your tour and you will enjoy your stay in Afghanistan

Downtown Kabul, Afghanistan - September 2019

Kabul is the capital and largest city of Afghanistan, located in the eastern section of the country. It is also a municipality, forming part of the greater Kabul Province. According to estimates in 2019, the population of Kabul is 4.114 million, which includes all the major ethnic groups of Afghanistan. Rapid urbanization had made Kabul the world's 75th largest city.

Kabul is located high up in a narrow valley between the Hindu Kush mountains, with an elevation of 1,790 meters (5,873 ft) making it one of the highest capitals in the world. The city is said to be over 3,500 years old.

District 1 contains most of the old city. Downtown Kabul mostly consist of Districts 2, 4 and 10. Source: Wikipedia

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Kabul City Streets Under Lockdown!

Walking in some streets of Kabul under quarantine, still more than 20% people in Afghanistan do not take it Seriously,

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stock footage also available..
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Travel to Afghanistan | Documentary And History About Afghanistan In Urdu & Hindi |افغانستان کی سیر

Travel to Afghanistan | Documentary And History About Afghanistan In Urdu & Hindi |افغانستان کی سیر
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Eid in Herat 2

this video which is in two parts is showing the culture of Hospitality of the people of Herat who are living in Herat from different Afghan clangs and ethnic groups, this is showing the Eid festival which remained for the remembrance of prophet Ebrahim or Abraham who was told by god to sacrifice his only son. this called Eid Qurban.
the camera is going in different houses to show that how the people are servicing their guests in Eid Qurban.

Ethnicities in Iran - Baloch people 1

#SistanAndBaluchestan #IranStudies #IranPrograms
Baloch people:
The Baloch or Baluch (Balochi: بلوچ) are an Iranian people who live mainly in the Balochistan region of the southeastern-most edge of the Iranian plateau in Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan, as well as neighboring regions, including those in India; and having a significant diaspora in the Arabian Peninsula.

They mainly speak Balochi, a Northwestern Iranian language, in contrast to their location on the Southeast of the Persosphere. About 50% of the total Baloch population live in Balochistan, a western province of Pakistan; 40% of the Baloch population are settled in Sindh; and a significant number of Baloch people in Punjab in Pakistan. They make up nearly 3.6% of Pakistan's population, about 2% of Iran's (1.5 million), and about 2% of Afghanistan's.

Etymology:
The exact origin of the word 'Baloch' is unclear. Rawlinson (1873) believed that it is derived from the name of the Babylonian king and god Belus. Dames (1904) believed that it is derived from the Persian term for cockscomb, said to have been used as a crest on the helmets of Baloch troops in 6th century BCE. Herzfeld (1968) proposed that it is derived from the Median term brza-vaciya, which describes a loud or aggressive way of speaking. Naseer Dashti (2012) presents another possibility, that of being derived from the name of the ethnic group 'Balaschik' living in Balashagan, between the Caspian Sea and Lake Van in present-day Turkey and Azerbaijan, who are believed to have migrated to Balochistan during the Sassanid times. The remnants of the original name such as 'Balochuk' and 'Balochiki' are said to be still used as ethnic names in Balochistan.


History:
According to Baloch lore, their ancestors hail from Aleppo in what is now Syria. They claim to be descendants of Ameer Hamza, uncle of the prophet Muhammad, who settled in Halab (present-day Aleppo). They fled to the Sistan region, remaining there for nearly 500 years until they fled to the Makran region following a deception against the Sistan leader Badr-ud-Din.

However, this origin story is not borne out by historical evidence. Based on an analysis of the linguistic connections of the Balochi language, which is one of the Western Iranian languages, the original homeland of the Balochi tribes was likely to the east or southeast of the central Caspian region. The Baloch began migrating towards the east in the late Sasanian period. The cause of the migration is unknown but may have been as a result of the generally unstable conditions in the Caspian area. The migrations occurred over several centuries.

By the 9th century, Arab writers refer to the Baloch as living in the area between Kerman, Khorasan, Sistan, and Makran in what is now eastern Iran. Although they kept flocks of sheep, the Baloches also engaged in plundering travellers on the desert routes. This brought them into conflict with the Buyids, and later the Ghaznavids and the Seljuqs. Adud al-Dawla of the Buyid dynasty launched a punitive campaign against them and defeated them in 971–972. After this, the Baloch continued their eastward migration towards what is now Balochistan province of Pakistan, although some remained behind and there are still Baloch in eastern part of the Iranian Sistan-Baluchestan and Kerman provinces. By the 13th–14th centuries waves of Baloch were moving into Sindh, and by the 15th century into the Punjab. According to Dr. Akhtar Baloch, Professor at University of Karachi, the Balochis migrated from Balochistan during the Little Ice Age and settled in Sindh and Punjab. The Little Ice Age is conventionally defined as a period extending from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries,or alternatively, from about 1300 to about 1850. Although climatologists and historians working with local records no longer expect to agree on either the start or end dates of this period, which varied according to local conditions. According to Professor Baloch, the climate of Balochistan was very cold and the region was inhabitable during the winter so the Baloch people migrated in waves and settled in Sindh and Punjab.

The area where the Baloch tribes settled was disputed between the Persian Safavids and the Mughal emperors. Although the Mughals managed to establish some control over the eastern parts of the area, by the 17th century, a tribal leader named Mir Hasan established himself as the first Khan of the Baloch. In 1666, he was succeeded by Mir Aḥmad Khan Qambarani who established the Balochi Khanate of Kalat under the Ahmadzai dynasty. Originally in alliance with the Mughals, the Khanate lost its autonomy in 1839 with the signing of a treaty with the British colonial government and the region effectively became part of British Raj.


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Children of Afghanistan, Faces of Afghanistan

Let the faces of these precious people draw you into compassion.........the remote Sheva people in the north are amazing. They said there was snow covering everything there 9 months out of the year.......

Eid in Herat 1

this video which is in two parts is showing the culture of Hospitality of the people of Herat who are living in Herat from different Afghan clangs and ethnic groups, this is showing the Eid festival which remained for the remembrance of prophet Ebrahim or Abraham who was told by god to sacrifice his only son. this called Eid Qurban.
the camera is going in different houses to show that how the people are servicing their guests in Eid Qurban.

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