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???? LIVE: La Palma Volcanic Eruption, Ocean Entry (Feed #3)

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???? LIVE: La Palma Volcanic Eruption, Ocean Entry (Feed #3)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV has 2 other live streams of this eruption. Find them here:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe to be notified of new videos.

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja
x

???? LIVE: La Palma Volcano Eruption, the Canary Islands (Feed #2)

A volcanic eruption began on Sunday, September 19th at the Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Please subscribe

--------------- Sources ---------------

- RTVC / TelevisionCanaria & RTVE (Cameras and news)
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Drone footage: © Geological Survey of Spain (IGME) & Cabildo de la Palma (
- Roque de los Muchachos Observatory Feed (Sky-live.TV, European project EELabs)
Live images of the volcanic eruption produced in Montaña Rajada, in the municipality of El Paso on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain), taken by the Interreg EELabs project camera, which from the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía , Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias), looks towards the Caldera de Taburiente towards the South of the Island.
- Instituto Geografico Nacional for seismographs and animation maps (ign.es)
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume
- La-Palma247.com and La-Palma-Aktuell.de (still cams)
- Wind and carbon monoxide (CO) map provided by windy.com

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

--------------- Camera Details ---------------

Camera 1
Location: Parroquia La Sagrada Familia (5km)
Coords: 28.6348°N 17.8894°W

Camera 2
Location: Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (16km)
Coords: 28.7541°N 17.8892°W

Camera 3
Location: Puerto Tazacorte
3.7km from ocean entry
7.9km from volcano
Coords: 28.6390°N, -17.945°W

--------------- From Wikipedia ---------------

La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometers (273 sq mi) making it the fifth-largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma, and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de Los Muchachos, at 2,423 meters (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks!
#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja
x

???? LIVE: La Palma Volcano Eruption in the Canary Islands (Feed #1)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV has 2 other live streams of this eruption. Find them here:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
- RTVC / TelevisionCanaria & RTVE (Cameras and news)
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then dividing by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometers (273 sq mi) making it the fifth-largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma, and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de Los Muchachos, at 2,423 meters (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side are the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja
x

Day 40: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja
x

Day 37: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

Day 43: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

Day 47: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

Day 45: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

Day 35: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

Day 48: 12 hours of footage from Camera 3 (La Palma Volcano)

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

Afar.TV's other live streams of this eruption:
La Palma Eruption Feed 1:
La Palma Eruption Feed 2:

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
Video Thumbnail: Instituto Español de Oceanografía, IEO, via Vulcana IEO
RTVE Noticias / Television Canaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja
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Day 37: Lava Flow Breakout from Main Vent at La Palma Volcano

A volcanic eruption began Sunday afternoon on September 19th on Cumbre Vieja de La Palma, in the Las Manchas area, after thousands of earthquakes have been registered in the area in recent days, where a huge column of volcanic materials can be seen.

To help the people of La Palma who have lost their homes, you can make a donation here: Thanks!

Sources:
RTVC / TelevisionCanaria
- Latest statistics (lava area*, buildings and roads destroyed): Copernicus Emergency Management Service (© 2021 European Union),
- Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN): SO2 emissions, total lava volume

* Afar.tv obtains total lava volume in real-time by using the latest metrics available for total estimated volume and then divide by time. These values are recalibrated when new metrics are released by scientists. Some other stats provided by Afar.tv may be rounded values of the source data.

From Wikipedia:
La Palma, also San Miguel de La Palma, is the most north-westerly island of the Canary Islands, Spain. La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. The total population at the end of 2020 was 85,840, of which 15,716 lived in the capital, Santa Cruz de La Palma and about 20,467 in Los Llanos de Aridane. Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

In 1815, the German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the Canary Islands. It was as a result of his visit to Tenerife, where he visited the Las Cañadas caldera, and then later to La Palma, where he visited the Taburiente caldera, that the Spanish word for cauldron or large cooking pot – caldera – was introduced into the geological vocabulary. In the center of the island is the Caldera de Taburiente National Park; one of four national parks in the Canary Islands.

La Palma, like the other islands of the Canary Island archipelago, is a volcanic ocean island. The volcano rises almost 7 km (4 mi) above the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. There is road access from sea level to the summit at 2,426 m (7,959 ft),[4] which is marked by an outcrop of rocks called Los Muchachos (The Lads). This is the site of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, one of the world's premier astronomical observatories.

La Palma's geography is a result of the volcanic formation of the island. The highest peaks reach over 2,400 m (7,874 ft) above sea level, and the base of the island is located almost 4,000 m (13,123 ft) below sea level. The northern part of La Palma is dominated by the Caldera de Taburiente, with a width of 9 km (6 mi) and a depth of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). It is surrounded by a ring of mountains ranging from 1,600 m (5,249 ft) to 2,400 m (7,874 ft) in height. On its northern side is the exposed remains of the original seamount. Only the deep Barranco de las Angustias (Ravine of Anxiety) ravine leads into the inner area of the caldera, which is a national park. It can be reached only by hiking. The outer slopes are cut by numerous gorges which run from 2,000 m (6,562 ft) down to the sea. Today, only a few of these carry water due to the many water tunnels that have been cut into the island's structure.

From the Caldera de Taburiente to the south runs the ridge Cumbre Nueva ('New Ridge', which despite its name is older than the Cumbre Vieja, 'Old Ridge.') The southern part of La Palma consists of the Cumbre Vieja, a volcanic ridge formed by numerous volcanic cones built of lava and scoria. The Cumbre Vieja is active but dormant, with the last eruption occurring in 1971 at the Teneguía vent which is located at the southern end of the Cumbre Vieja, the Punta de Fuencaliente ('Point of the Hot Fountain'). Beyond Punta de Fuencaliente, the Cumbre Vieja continues in a southerly direction as a submarine volcano.

Read more here:



Map of La Palma Island:


Please subscribe. Thanks

#LaPalma #volcano #CanaryIslands #CumbreVieja

???? LIVE: Hawaii Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary @ Maui Sands in 4K

Live webcam feed from the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary off the island of Maui. The Sanctuary, which spans all the way to the mysterious island of Molokai and Lanai in the distance, is the birthing and mating grounds of the North Pacific Humpback Whale population. They can be seen breaching, fin, and tail slapping in large numbers here from December to April. This live feed rotates from the north (tiny Mokuho'Oniki Island and Kahana, Maui), west (Island of Molokai) to the south (Island of Lanai).

Just in front is the Kahekili Marine Reserve - one of only three conservation zones on Maui and a popular spot for watching green sea turtles feed on seaweed. Spot the occasional pod of dolphins or a rare sighting of the critically endangered Hawaiian Monk Seal. Morning rainbows are common and the sunsets in the evening are spectacular. To ensure the privacy of guests staying at Maui Sands 4B, the sound from the webcam is not live but was prerecorded from this exact spot earlier.

This is the exact view that guests of Maui Sands Unit 4B experience right from the ground floor lanai. Unit 4B is a carbon-neutral, eco-friendly, and fully-equipped condo. Maui Sands is one of the original condo resorts in all of West Maui and it has retained a lot of the old Hawaii vintage feel of the '60s before the hotel boom. If you would like to experience this view in person, visit to find out more.

The researchers at the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary at NOAA has asked for your help in spotting Humpback Whales. Specifically, they want our viewers to report anything unusual with the Humpbacks such as vessel strikes, entanglements, etc. If you spot a humpback and more importantly see one in distress, please make note of the day and time (time on the bottom left of the video) and email the details to whalesighting@mauisands.com. We will forward your report right away to the Maui Island coordinator at NOAA.

If you spot any other marine creatures such as Hawaiian Monk Seals, Spinner Dolphins or Sea Turtles (Green or Hawksbill) you are encouraged to report it in the live chat.

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