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10 Best Places to Visit in Guernsey

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What To See In Guernsey.Places To Visit In Guernsey

Guernsey Tourist Attractions.Things To See In Guernsey.Places To See In Guernsey

Things To Do In Guernsey.Tourist Attractions In Guernsey

Guernsey Attractions.What To Do In Guernsey.
Places To Visit In Guernsey
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Guernsey Island attractions and points of interest

Guernsey is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. With several smaller nearby islands, it forms a jurisdiction within the Bailiwick of Guernsey, a Crown dependency. Ports and harbours exist at St Peter Port and St Sampson. There is a paved airport: Guernsey Airport but no working railway. Guernsey, with its sandy beaches, cliff walks, seascapes and offshore islands has been a tourist destination since at least the Victorian days.

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Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel near the French coast, and is a self-governing British Crown dependency. It's known for beach resorts like Cobo Bay and the scenery of its coastal cliffs. Castle Cornet, a 13th-century harbor fortification in the capital of St. Peter Port, now contains history and military museums. Hauteville House is the lavish former home of French writer, Victor Hugo.

Guernsey is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. With several smaller nearby islands, it forms a jurisdiction within the Bailiwick of Guernsey, a Crown dependency. The jurisdiction is made up of ten parishes on the island of Guernsey, three other inhabited islands (Herm, Jethou and Lihou), and many small islets and rocks. The jurisdiction is not part of the United Kingdom, although defence and most foreign relations are handled by the British Government.

The entire jurisdiction lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community with access to the single market for the purposes of free trade in goods. Taken together with the separate jurisdictions of Alderney and Sark it forms the Bailiwick of Guernsey. The two Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey together form the geographical grouping known as the Channel Islands.

For most of the Second World War, the Channel Islands were occupied by German troops. Before the occupation, 80% of Guernsey children had been evacuated to England to live with relatives or strangers during the war. Some children were never reunited with their families. Guernsey, Herm and some other smaller islands together have a total area of 71 square kilometres (27 sq mi) and coastlines of about 46 kilometres (29 mi). Elevation varies from sea level to 110 m (360 ft) at Hautnez on Guernsey. There are many smaller islands, islets, rocks and reefs in Guernsey waters. Combined with a tidal range of 10 metres (33 feet) and fast currents of up to 12 knots, this makes sailing in local waters dangerous.

Ports and harbours exist at St Peter Port and St Sampson. There is a paved airport: Guernsey Airport but no working railway. The States of Guernsey wholly own their own airline, Aurigny. The decision to purchase the airline was made to protect important airlinks to and from the island and the sale was completed on 15 May 2003. It was announced that the States would sell Aurigny to a rival Channel Islands' airline, Blue Islands, in July 2010, but the talks fell through in September 2010 due to uncertainty as to whether arrival/departure slots at Gatwick Airport could be guaranteed.

The Guernsey Railway, virtually an electric tramway, began working on 20 February 1892 and was abandoned on 9 June 1934. It replaced an earlier transport system which was worked by steam, the Guernsey Steam Tramway. The latter began service on 6 June 1879 with six locomotives. Alderney is now the only Channel Island with a working railway.

Guernsey, with its sandy beaches, cliff walks, seascapes and offshore islands has been a tourist destination since at least the Victorian days. Guernsey enters Britain in Bloom with St. Martin Parish winning the small town category twice in 2006 and 2011, Saint Peter Port winning the large coastal category in 2014 and St Peter's winning the small coastal prize in 2015. Herm has won Britain in Bloom categories several times: in 2002, 2008, and 2012, Herm won the Britain in Bloom Gold Award.

( Guernsey - UK ) is well know as a tourist destination because of the variety of places you can enjoy while you are visiting Guernsey . Through a series of videos we will try to show you recommended places to visit in Guernsey - UK

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VisitGuernsey: Welcome To Guernsey

Nestling snugly in the bay of St Malo and 70 miles from mainland Britain, the Channel Island of Guernsey is a heady mix of French and British cultures. This collision of lifestyles has created a unique environment, where familiarity is tempered by the unexpected, but where you'll always feel welcome. It's a very special place, one that leaves a lasting impression on all who visit.

Here you'll discover a community that looks to the future for inspiration, but where traditional values still hold sway; where the influence of the Continent is keenly felt, but not to the extent that it dents an unwavering loyalty to the British Crown; and where the dynamism of the global finance industry sits easily alongside centuries old traditions.

Of course for many people, it's the scenery that makes Guernsey so special. And it's easy to see why. Our cliffs, coves and commons provide a real treat for walkers and the abundance and variety of our floral heritage will inspire you. Plus there are the sister islands of Herm, Sark and Alderney to explore.

Jersey Vacation Travel Guide | Expedia (4K)



100 miles from the coast of Britain and just 14 off the coast of France is Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands. Jersey is compact, making it easy to explore. Country lanes and walking trails lace the island, ensuring Jersey’s attractions are never far away.

After exploring the picture-perfect capital, St. Helier, head off to explore the island. Each of Jersey’s four coastlines has its own distinctive personality. Head eastward to La Hougue Bie, one of the world’s oldest buildings, and the port of Gorey, with its iconic medieval castle.

Be sure to take in a few sections of the North Coast Path, which offers some of the island’s most dramatic views. Then head south along the west coast to St. Ouen’s Bay, where surfers will find some of the island’s best waves and history buffs can explore the Channel Islands Military Museum. On the southern coast, don’t miss the sheltered sands of St. Brelade, the WW2 German command bunker at Noirmont Point, the tiny islet of Janvrin’s Tomb, and St. Aubin’s Fort.

While the coastline serves up Jersey’s finest views, the island’s interior offers plenty for visitors too, such as the Jersey War Tunnels, the Hamptonne Country Life Museum, the Pallot Steam and Motor Museum and the Jersey Zoo.

If you’re looking for history, adventure, incredible food, and total relaxation, Jersey weaves it all together into something truly magical. It’s not quite British and it’s not quite French, but Jersey is 100% unique.
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Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel near the French coast, and is a self-governing British Crown dependency. It's known for beach resorts like Cobo Bay and the scenery of its coastal cliffs. Castle Cornet, a 13th-century harbor fortification in the capital of St. Peter Port, now contains history and military museums. Hauteville House is the lavish former home of French writer, Victor Hugo.

Guernsey is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. With several smaller nearby islands, it forms a jurisdiction within the Bailiwick of Guernsey, a Crown dependency. The jurisdiction is made up of ten parishes on the island of Guernsey, three other inhabited islands (Herm, Jethou and Lihou), and many small islets and rocks. The jurisdiction is not part of the United Kingdom, although defence and most foreign relations are handled by the British Government.

The entire jurisdiction lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community with access to the single market for the purposes of free trade in goods. Taken together with the separate jurisdictions of Alderney and Sark it forms the Bailiwick of Guernsey. The two Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey together form the geographical grouping known as the Channel Islands.

For most of the Second World War, the Channel Islands were occupied by German troops. Before the occupation, 80% of Guernsey children had been evacuated to England to live with relatives or strangers during the war. Some children were never reunited with their families. Guernsey, Herm and some other smaller islands together have a total area of 71 square kilometres (27 sq mi) and coastlines of about 46 kilometres (29 mi). Elevation varies from sea level to 110 m (360 ft) at Hautnez on Guernsey. There are many smaller islands, islets, rocks and reefs in Guernsey waters. Combined with a tidal range of 10 metres (33 feet) and fast currents of up to 12 knots, this makes sailing in local waters dangerous.

Ports and harbours exist at St Peter Port and St Sampson. There is a paved airport: Guernsey Airport but no working railway. The States of Guernsey wholly own their own airline, Aurigny. The decision to purchase the airline was made to protect important airlinks to and from the island and the sale was completed on 15 May 2003. It was announced that the States would sell Aurigny to a rival Channel Islands' airline, Blue Islands, in July 2010, but the talks fell through in September 2010 due to uncertainty as to whether arrival/departure slots at Gatwick Airport could be guaranteed.

The Guernsey Railway, virtually an electric tramway, began working on 20 February 1892 and was abandoned on 9 June 1934. It replaced an earlier transport system which was worked by steam, the Guernsey Steam Tramway. The latter began service on 6 June 1879 with six locomotives. Alderney is now the only Channel Island with a working railway.

Guernsey, with its sandy beaches, cliff walks, seascapes and offshore islands has been a tourist destination since at least the Victorian days. Guernsey enters Britain in Bloom with St. Martin Parish winning the small town category twice in 2006 and 2011, Saint Peter Port winning the large coastal category in 2014 and St Peter's winning the small coastal prize in 2015. Herm has won Britain in Bloom categories several times: in 2002, 2008, and 2012, Herm won the Britain in Bloom Gold Award.

( Guernsey - UK ) is well know as a tourist destination because of the variety of places you can enjoy while you are visiting Guernsey . Through a series of videos we will try to show you recommended places to visit in Guernsey - UK

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10 delicious foods to try on Guernsey

10 delicious foods to try in the Channel Islands on Guernsey and Sark including Crab sandwiches and salad, seafood and lobster, Guernsey Gache and cream teas, Guernsey bean jar washed down with Randalls beer or Rocquettes Cider

Top 10 Cities and Towns of Guernsey

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1) Castel
2) Forest
3) St Andrew
4) St Martin
5) St Peter Port
6) St Pierre du Bois
7) St Sampson
8) St Saviour
9) Torteval
10) Vale

Guernsey (/ˈgɜ:nzi/, /ˈɡɜrnzi/ gurn-zee), officially the Bailiwick of Guernsey (French: Bailliage de Guernesey, IPA: [bajaʒ də ɡɛʁnəzɛ]), is a British Crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. As a bailiwick, Guernsey embraces not only all ten parishes on the Island of Guernsey, but also the islands of Alderney and Sark -- each with its own parliament -- and the smaller islands of Herm, Jethou and Lihou. Although its defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom,[3] the Bailiwick is not part of the United Kingdom but rather a possession of the British Crown. It lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community for the purposes of free trade in goods. Together, the Bailiwick of Guernsey and Bailiwick of Jersey form the geographical grouping known as the Channel Islands.

Around 6000 B.C., rising sea created the English Channel and separated the Norman promontories that became the bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey from continental Europe.[4] Neolithic farmers then settled on its coast and built the dolmens and menhirs found in the islands today.

During their migration to Brittany, Britons occupied the Lenur islands (the former name of the Channel Islands[5]) including Sarnia or Lisia (Guernsey) and Angia (Jersey). It was formerly thought that the island's original name was Sarnia, but recent research indicates that this might have been the Latin name for Sark.[citation needed] (Sarnia nonetheless remains the island's traditional designation.) Travelling from the Kingdom of Gwent, Saint Sampson, later the abbot of Dol in Brittany, is credited with the introduction of Christianity to Guernsey.[6]

In 933 the islands, formerly under the control of William I, then Duchy of Brittany were annexed by the Duchy of Normandy. The island of Guernsey and the other Channel Islands represent the last remnants of the medieval Duchy of Normandy.[6]

During the Middle Ages, the island was haven for Pirates that would use the Lamping Technique to ground ships close to her waters . This intensified during the Hundred Years War, when, starting in 1339, the island was occupied by the Capetians on several occasions.[6]

In 1372, the island was invaded by Aragonese mercenaries under the command of Owain Lawgoch (remembered as Yvon de Galles), who was in the pay of the French king. Lawgoch and his dark-haired mercenaries were later absorbed into Guernsey legend as an invasion by fairies from across the sea.

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A guide to Guernsey

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Best places to visit

Best places to visit - Huddersfield (United Kingdom) Best places to visit - Slideshows from all over the world - City trips, nature pictures, etc.

Walking holidays in Guernsey

Guernsey's well marked coastal paths and green lanes offer stunning walks for all levels of fitness. Join us for a gentle ramble with some well deserved breaks for tea and cake!
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Visit Guernsey 2015 TV Adverts - Great Things Happen in Guernsey

VisitGuernsey 2015 spring, summer and autumn TV adverts.

Find out more at

Whether you fly to the island or travel to Guernsey by ferry, you could be exploring the Bailiwick within hours of setting off from home. Discover our rich heritage, explore our sister islands on an island hopping holiday or enjoy one of our Tasty Walks.

Best places to visit

Best places to visit - Cromer (United Kingdom) Best places to visit - Slideshows from all over the world - City trips, nature pictures, etc.

Visiting Guernsey by Cruise Liner

Experience Guernsey from the eyes of a cruise passenger; from guided coach tours and wandering around bustling St Peter Port, to the sandy beaches and top places to visit on the Channel Island.
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TOP 10 Best Island in the United Kingdom


TOP 10 Best Island in the United Kingdom:
Isle of Wight, Isle of Arran, Anglesey, Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey, Lewis and Harris, Mainland, St Mary's, Isle of Skye

Jersey Island attractions and points of interest

Jersey is a Crown dependency of the United Kingdom, located near the coast of Normandy, France. The bailiwick consists of the island of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands, along with surrounding uninhabited islands and rocks. St Helier is the capital of the Island, although Government House is situated in St Saviour. You must visit the port, the beaches and the picturesque towns.

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Stunning Bailiwick of Guernsey

Explore the unique Bailiwick of Guernsey from the air and land. Take a walk along the spectacular south coast cliffs or stroll across the wide sandy beaches to the north. Stroll through the picturesque seafront capital St Peter Port or take a day trip and discover the unspoilt and stunning natural beauty of Guernsey's sister islands, Herm, Sark and Alderney. The islands are just a 45-minute flight from the UK but feel a world away from the chaos of everyday life.

When YOU Visit Guernsey For The Who, What, Where And Why Use Bailiwick Almanac

When YOU Visit Guernsey For The Who, What, Where And Why Use the Bailiwick Almanac;
Guernsey Food & Restaurants ..
Guernsey webcams ..
Guernsey what's on ..
Guernsey Bus Locator ...
Bailiwick Almanac would like to thank Britain's Best Breaks for the kind permission in using their video. For other great ideas on UK breaks visit; .

Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Places to see in ( Guernsey - UK )

Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel near the French coast, and is a self-governing British Crown dependency. It's known for beach resorts like Cobo Bay and the scenery of its coastal cliffs. Castle Cornet, a 13th-century harbor fortification in the capital of St. Peter Port, now contains history and military museums. Hauteville House is the lavish former home of French writer, Victor Hugo.

Guernsey is an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. With several smaller nearby islands, it forms a jurisdiction within the Bailiwick of Guernsey, a Crown dependency. The jurisdiction is made up of ten parishes on the island of Guernsey, three other inhabited islands (Herm, Jethou and Lihou), and many small islets and rocks. The jurisdiction is not part of the United Kingdom, although defence and most foreign relations are handled by the British Government.

The entire jurisdiction lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community with access to the single market for the purposes of free trade in goods. Taken together with the separate jurisdictions of Alderney and Sark it forms the Bailiwick of Guernsey. The two Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey together form the geographical grouping known as the Channel Islands.

For most of the Second World War, the Channel Islands were occupied by German troops. Before the occupation, 80% of Guernsey children had been evacuated to England to live with relatives or strangers during the war. Some children were never reunited with their families. Guernsey, Herm and some other smaller islands together have a total area of 71 square kilometres (27 sq mi) and coastlines of about 46 kilometres (29 mi). Elevation varies from sea level to 110 m (360 ft) at Hautnez on Guernsey. There are many smaller islands, islets, rocks and reefs in Guernsey waters. Combined with a tidal range of 10 metres (33 feet) and fast currents of up to 12 knots, this makes sailing in local waters dangerous.

Ports and harbours exist at St Peter Port and St Sampson. There is a paved airport: Guernsey Airport but no working railway. The States of Guernsey wholly own their own airline, Aurigny. The decision to purchase the airline was made to protect important airlinks to and from the island and the sale was completed on 15 May 2003. It was announced that the States would sell Aurigny to a rival Channel Islands' airline, Blue Islands, in July 2010, but the talks fell through in September 2010 due to uncertainty as to whether arrival/departure slots at Gatwick Airport could be guaranteed.

The Guernsey Railway, virtually an electric tramway, began working on 20 February 1892 and was abandoned on 9 June 1934. It replaced an earlier transport system which was worked by steam, the Guernsey Steam Tramway. The latter began service on 6 June 1879 with six locomotives. Alderney is now the only Channel Island with a working railway.

Guernsey, with its sandy beaches, cliff walks, seascapes and offshore islands has been a tourist destination since at least the Victorian days. Guernsey enters Britain in Bloom with St. Martin Parish winning the small town category twice in 2006 and 2011, Saint Peter Port winning the large coastal category in 2014 and St Peter's winning the small coastal prize in 2015. Herm has won Britain in Bloom categories several times: in 2002, 2008, and 2012, Herm won the Britain in Bloom Gold Award.

( Guernsey - UK ) is well know as a tourist destination because of the variety of places you can enjoy while you are visiting Guernsey . Through a series of videos we will try to show you recommended places to visit in Guernsey - UK

Join us for more :






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